Loving-Kindness Meditation

Posted by Lowry.Manders on February 24, 2015

Love-Kindess

Do you know the Loving-Kindness meditation?

“May all beings be happy.  May all beings be free from suffering. May all beings be well. May all beings be at peace.”

I learned it at the spiritual yoga class that I have attended on and off for several years. (Tuesday evening at Arapaho United Methodist Church in Richardson.) Whenever I make it to class, I consider it a gift for my mind, body, and spirit. 

After our stretches and poses, after our deep relaxation in "corpse" pose, after meditating on a spiritual lesson, we close the practice by reciting this meditation as a community, praying hands held to hearts.

“May all beings be happy.  May all beings be free from suffering. May all beings be well. May all beings be at peace.”

It is also called the "Metta Bhavana," and comes from the Buddhist tradition. It is a tool for developing compassion in one’s self and in the world.

I love the way it uses the word "being" instead of "people," so that our loving wishes extend to the trees and creatures of the Earth, to the unborn children of the world and those souls on their way out.

We come together to recite it no matter what discord and unrest is happening in the world. We recite it on a day when religious intolerance rears its ugly head at our state capitol, on a day that dozens of Pakistani school children have been murdered, on a day when the truths about our own country’s torture methods are exposed, on a day when an innocent journalist is beheaded by evil religious extremists, on a day when a young light for the world like Kayla Mueller has been violently extinguished.

Like an affirmation of faith, we recite this hope for God's world, for God's people, wherever they may be, whatever their religion.

“May All Beings be happy. May all beings be free from suffering. May all beings be well. May all beings be at peace.”

But perhaps the best part of this meditation, this blessing, is the final word: “Namaste.The divine in me sees the divine in you.

The meaning of this word fully encompasses the compassion that we are called to in this world. The compassion that Jesus had when he saw the divine in the outcast, in the children, in the criminal, in the women of his day. It is what he meant when he told us that we are the light of the world, the salt of the Earth.

We are ALL made in God’s image.

Each one of us, no exceptions. When we strive to look for that divine light, that innate goodness or "God"ness in one another, that grain of original "Love" (instead of original sin), then and only then will we have peace. Peace in our hearts, peace in our homes, peace in our relationships, peace among our religions, and peace in our world.

Namaste.

Respect

Comments

Posted by Melanie on
Beautiful!
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